CBSE Class 12 English Long Compositions – Articles

CBSE Class 12 English Long Compositions – Articles


CBSE Class 12 English Long Compositions – Articles

BASED ON VERBAL STIMULUS
ARTICLES FOR MAGAZINES AND NEWSPAPERS (150-200 WORDS)
Students may be asked to write a composition based on a verbal/visual output (in about 150-200 words). Output may be descriptive or argumentative in nature. It shall be in the form of an article for a newspaper or a school magazine.
The ‘Verbal input’ may include broad hints, a short outline or only a suggested beginning. The ‘Visual input’ may be in the form of a figure, a diagram, a chart or a cartoon. The aim of inserting an input is two-fold:
  1. to lay down a general outline for the development of the article, and
  2. to discourage cramming. The students are expected to express their own views or ideas on a particular topic or issue in their own language.
While writing an article keep the following points in mind:
  1. Study carefully the hints/points given in the ‘Verbal input’.
  2. Arrange the hints given in the order you want to develop them for the article.
  3. You may have some new ideas or views about the issue. Note down your ideas. Organise them properly.
  4. Coordinate your ideas with the given hints. Now arrange them in a logical order.
  5. Put your ideas under different main headings.
  6. Now add sub-points to the main point.
  7. Develop each point in a systematic or logical manner.
  8. Substantiate your argument if you are writing on a debatable point.
  9. Introduce the topic, main idea or main issue in the first few sentences.
  10. Your article must end with your conclusion on the topic or issue.
The distribution of marks could be on the following lines:
Format : 1 mark
Content : 4 marks
Expression : 5 marks
Format includes: Title and writer’s name.
Content: Value points related to the topic.
Expression: Grammatical accuracy or spellings, coherence, relevance of ideas and style.
Writing is a process which involves thinking, collecting ideas, developing them, organising them in a draft form and revising the draft by editing it carefully and critically.
Thinking involves focussing on the subject, thinking about the topics and ideas associated with it.
Collecting ideas involves collecting as many ideas on the subject through brain-storming or discussion. It also means gathering information from various sources.
A Draft is an early version of an organised process of writing.
Revising involves looking at the drafted version carefully and critically. Look at the draft from the reader’s point of view and remove any phrases or sentences which are awkward or abstract.
The essential features of a good composition are:
Coherence—It means that the ideas should fit together.
Flow—It means that sentences should be linked up.
Relevance—Every idea must relate to the topic.
Order—The ideas must be effectively and logically organised.
Inclusiveness—Anything not very important must be omitted.
ARTICLES FOR SCHOOL MAGAZINE
SOLVED QUESTIONS
Question 1:
Last week as you were coming back from school you happened to see a huge plastic bag full of leftovers of food being flung into the middle of the road from a speeding car. You wondered how people can be so devoid of civic sense. Write an article in 125-150 words on why we lack civic sense and how civic sense can be inculcated in children at a very young age. You are Shiva/Shamini.
Lack of Civic Sense
—Shamini
In the society, people of different types and different opinions live. They do not think for the betterment of the society. They only think about themselves. They have become selfish and narrow in their thought. In India, people hardly follow any rules. They have no respect for public property. On railway platform, they do not follow any instructions. They spit anywhere or at any place. They do not care for what they are doing. They even throw away the polythenes, water bottle etc. on the platform. They lack civic sense. Inculcating a civic sense is the need of hour. Parents must inculcate civic sense among children at an early age. The values of cleanliness, discipline and tolerance must be inculcated among them. Parents must encourage their children to keep their surroundings clean. All these things must be taught at an early age. They are the future of the nation and they must take the responsibility of a responsible citizen.
Question 2:
You are Varshini. This year your school arranged a special cultural programme on the theme ‘Service and Sacrifice’ in commemoration of the International Year of Volunteers. Write an article about this cultural programme for your school magazine in about 200 words.
Answer:
Service and Sacrifice
(by Varshini)
‘Service before self’, keeping this motto in mind, ABC School, Vikaspuri organised a cultural programme in commemoration of the International Year of Volunteers. The programme commenced with a prayer service followed by a special presentation by the Scouts and Guides Cell of the school. The one-hour dance drama, ‘Service and Sacrifice’ depicted beautifully how volunteers and cadets from the NCC deal with exigencies, risking their own lives.
In a heart-wrenching situation, a few people buried under the debris of a shattered building were rescued by the volunteers, who, unmindful of their own wounds and injuries, spared no efforts in saving their lives.
In an another situation, the panic-stricken people trapped on the twenty-second floor of a sky-scraper, were saved by the fire personnel. These and many more. The special light and sound effects and realistic sets added great colour to the programme.
The expressions showing tense moments, hustle-bustle, anxiety and panic were brought out beautifully by the young and talented cadets of the school.
The audience sat spellbound as they were greatly touched by the pathos created by different traumatic situations coupled with the noble sacrifice of the volunteers. They gave a standing ovation to the participants reflecting their pleasure and appreciation.
Eminent journalists were the special guests. Speaking on the occasion, they expressed immense satisfaction and pleasure at witnessing such a meaningful programme. Congratulating the participants on their brilliant performance, she cited many more
examples from her life highlighting the importance of duty before self.
Finally, Dr B.P. Singhal, the Principal proposed the vote of thanks. The evening became a memorable event for everybody.
Question 3:
Write an article in 20 words on the following topic to be published in your school magazine. You are Mumtaz/Mohd. Azam of XII Std., Bharathiya Vidya Bhavan, Delhi. Recently you read in the newspaper an incident in which the children tried to imitate the stunts shown on television and embraced death. You have decided to write an article on the hazards of television watching for kids and how the parents could guide them to watch the programmes in an effective way.
Answer:


Hazards of Television Watching for Kids
(by Mumtaz)
Recently I read in the newspaper an incident in which the children of Meerut tried to imitate the stunts shown on television and embraced death. The young kids feel thrilled and excited on watching the amazing stunts on television. They blindly imitate these screen heroes and while trying to emulate their actions, they hurt themselves : disastrously. The injuries prove fatal because no safeguards have been undertaken. The enthusiastic kids forget that these stunts are performed by specialists under well- controlled conditions.
It is upto parents to educate their children about the harmful effects of aping these super-human tricks and feats of bravery. They must draw the attention of the children to the mandatory warning displayed at the beginning of the advertisement/stunt. The parents should not snub their wards. They should channelise and harness the abundant energy of the kids by giving them effective guidance. The kids should be encouraged to indulge in healthy competitive games of physical and mental skill under strict parental supervision. This would help in proper development of the personality of the kids and ensure freedom from the dangers of mindless imitation of stunts.
Question 4:
Write an article in 200 words on ‘The Role of Youth in National Development’ to be published in your school magazine. You are Mumtaz/Mohd. Azam of XII Std., Bharathiya Vidya Bhavan, Delhi.
Answer:
The Role of Youth in National Development
(by Mumtaz)

Youths are the assets and hope of a nation. The future of a nation depends on its youth. They can play a very constructive role in the progress, uplift and development of a nation. The role of youth has become more important today as the modem era is becoming fast-paced, complex and complicated. The advent of computers and modem technology has brought a revolution in the field of information. Modem educated youth can help in national development by attending to the ills and shortcomings in various sectors. They can help the villagers shed their shackles of ignorance, illiteracy and superstition by acquainting them with true facts. New scientific techniques can help in raising the yield of crops. The problem of unemployment or underemployment can be overcome by establishing small scale industries. They can guide the rural youth about cheap raw material and profitable disposal of finished products. The youth can help in checking population growth by adopting family planning and presenting living examples to others. They can play a vital role in making India a great democratic, progressive and prosperous country steeped in old cultural values but equipped with modern scientific outlook. Last but not the least, they can play a vital role in transforming the moral fabric of society by curbing the vices of selfishness and greed and imbibing the spirit of self-sacrifice, sympathy and mutual confidence.
Question 5:
Write an article in 200 words on ‘The increasing crime rate in today’s society and ways to curb it’.
Answer:
The Increasing Crime Rate in Today’s Society
Modem society has advanced in science, technology and information. Prosperity has increased manifold. But progress and affluence have their negative aspect too. Crimes such as burglary, kidnapping, robbery, violence, assault, sexual harassment, rapes, threats, verbal abuse have become the bane of today’s society. Most of the deadly and dangerous crimes are organised and executed by professional criminals. The lords of the underworld run a parallel government. Government machinery and police are ineffective against their machinations. They extort money by coercion and suffer no qualms of conscience to kill a victim if the demand is not fulfilled. On a lower-level, the small-time urchins and pick-pockets grow up to be henchmen of the bosses and indulge in crimes against women and society. Despite the growth of private guards and ever-increasing number of civil police, the rate of crime is increasing day by day. This is quite a shocking trend. Healthy and active cooperation of the people, police and political leaders can control the situation. Political leaders having finks with the underworld should be identified and pressurised to yield to public opinion. In case, they do not redress the grievances of the people, they should be forced to resign and not elected again. The police must shake up its lethargy. Instead of harassing the person who lodges the F.I.R. (First Information Report), steps should be taken to apprehend the criminal and curb the crime. The general public needs enlightenment. The people should be conscious of their rights and duties. Only by observing a civic code of conduct, the elders can inspire the youth to combat crime.
Question 6:
Owning a car has become a status symbol these days. However, increase in the number of cars has added to various types of pollution and other problems. Write an article in not more than 200 words highlighting the urgent need for reducing these man-made problems, giving suitable suggestions. You are Vinod/Vidhi.
Answer:
Reducing Pollution
(by Vinod)
Delhi has become one of the most polluted cities in the country closely followed by Kolkata, Chennai and Mumbai. This is because of the millions of vehicles that ply on the roads of Delhi. Owning a car has become a status symbol. As a result the number of cars on the roads has become manifold. This has resulted in numerous problems. The primary one is of traffic congestion, traffic snarls and traffic-jams. Driving on the roads of Delhi has become a nightmare and a health hazard.
Vehicles emit fumes and poisonous gases which is a serious health hazard. Delhi has witnessed an increasing number of deaths among young children due to respiratory diseases caused presumably due to pollution. Man-made traffic hazards are creating havoc for the populace. The number of fatal accidents has also increased alarmingly.
The Delhi Government has taken measures to bring down the pollution level such as use of CNG buses and autorickshaws. The need of the hour is to support the government with public cooperation. Carpools should become the norm rather than the exception. Improved public transport system, use of lead free fuel and catalytic 1 converters will go a long way in easing the situation and creating a healthy city. Every open space should be covered with green trees to create lungs in the city and help in bringing back its glory.
Question 7:
You are Abhishek / Anubha studying in Plato Public School, New Delhi. While commuting for your school everyday you find many of your school boys and girls taking free lift from the passing cars, which you don’t like. Write an article in about 200 words on ‘The Evils of Hitch-hiking for publication in your school magazine.
Answer:
The Evils of Hitch-Hiking
(by Anubha)
Hitch-hiking may seem to be a thrilling adventure at first, but the habit of taking free lifts from the passing cars is fraught with dangerous consequences. In their zeal to enjoy the fun of a free ride the young school boys and girls do not know who the persons offering them lift are. Everyday we read so many cases of kidnapping, molestation, sexual abuse, rape and murder. Gone are the days when face used to be an index of the mind. Now one may smile and smile and yet be a villain. You can never be sure of the intentions of these Samaritans who may prove ugly customers and ruin young promising careers forever. I think this practice of seeking free lift should be discouraged by all the elders and well-wishers by educating the youth about the moral, physical and ethical aspects.
Many boys and young girls have been duped and ill-treated by anti-social elements by offering them free lifts, outings and entertainments. Although most of the victims bear the trauma silently, some of them are bold enough to inform the police and local authorities. This acts as an eye-opener to others and also helps the authorities to curb crimes by nabbing the anti-social elements.
Question 8:
You are Saurabh /Surabhi. Your school has been invited to participate in an inter-school on-the-spot writing competition, organised by the Lions Club of your area. Based on your past performance in such competitions you once again get selected for this proposed competition. The organisers of this competition have given only one topic to write about: My Dreams of the Next Millennium. Write an article in about 200 words on this topic.
Answer:
My Dreams of the Next Millennium
(by Surabhi)
The next millennium is going to be a purely scientific age. It will be a world ruled over by the technocrats. The previous three centuries of the second millennium have witnessed breath taking developments in the field of industry, agriculture and war-weapons.
The next millennium will see information technology reaching the peak. Domestic robots will replace human domestic servants. People will enjoy synthetic food and drinks. Trips to Moon and Mars will become so common that these space stations will be considered as picnic spots. In the next millennium India will become a super power. It will be the greatest country of the world not only in sheer numbers but also in the field of science and technology. It will become financially, scientifically as well as militarily strong and politically dominant. No nation of the world would dare to disrespect India or Indians. We will feel proud of being Indians.
Bio-technology will develop. The discovery of G-nome will help to understand the codes of genes properly. Grains and fruit will have enriched properties by further experiments in bio-sciences. Strains of high yielding varieties of rice, wheat, maize may be developed which will ensure complete freedom from drought and hunger. The harnessing of modem science may herald the era of instant food available in the form of tablets and capsules.
Question 9:
Writ.e an article for your school magazine justifying the need of education for girls in the country for national development. (word limit: 200 words)
Answer:
Education of Girls for National Development
The girl child is an ignored species in our male dominated society which still practises gender bias. There is an apparent discrimination in the upbringing and education of the girls in the rural areas, middle classes and the lower classes of the society. Female education is relegated to the background and all the family funds and resources are lavished on the upbringing and education of the sons.
The myopic parents, teachers and social reformers forget the need and importance of the education of girls. If we educate a boy, we educate a person. On the other hand, if we educate a girl, we educate a family. A girl acts as a bridge between two families. An educated girl can become independent and self-sufficient. She can contribute to the welfare of the family and society. The rise in the standard of living is possible when women supplement the incomes of the males. National development is impossible without the whole hearted contribution and active participation of women. We have seen the fate of some of the policies and schemes such as adult education and family planning foisted from above. They have failed miserably because women were not involved in them whole-heartedly. Hence we must educate girls if we want our nation to progress, and match the developed countries in all the spheres.
Question 10:
Kavita had a discussion with her friend on Information Technology. After getting from her a lot of ideas, she decides to write an article on Information Technology for her school magazine in about 200 words. Imagine you are Kavita. Write the article.
Answer:
Information Technology
(by Kavita)
Science has made our lives more comfortable. Modem technology has contributed towards the progress of society. Gone are the days of rubber and pencil, nib and pen. Children need not strain their heads for memorising dirty maths tables or go on cramming formulae or facts. In short the memory of students need not be overloaded. Science has done wonders for us. Today we have access to knowledge contained in books in any language, experiments or research going on in various countries. Newspapers, magazines and periodicals are becoming obsolete. Information technology has been revolutionised with the invention of computers. It has opened a new window on the world. Computer based information technology has increased efficiency and human capacity to work. One person can do the work of fifty persons and that too more efficiently and precisely. Computer technology may be used for storing, transferring and improving knowledge. The inter-linking of computers through worldwide network like Internet provides instantaneous knowledge and service. Electronic mail (E-mail) and electronic commerce (E-commerce) have come in vogue. Computer has indeed opened new vistas for humanity. The future of information technology is bright.
Question 11:With the onset of monsoons, mosquitoes have also arrived. As Ajay Arora of class XII, write an article for the school bulletin about the mosquito menace and the ways to get rid of it in not more than 200 words.
Answer:
Mosquito Menace
(by Ajay Arora, Class XII)
The monsoon in our state is a boon as well as a curse as it provides relief from the scorching heat of the sun but also becomes the source of problems as it brings mosquitoes with it. This year the death toll in our town from malaria, dengue and yellow fever has risen up to 45.
Mosquitoes breed in pools of stagnant water. The cesspools on the roads, water collected in coolers, overhead tanks, pots and pans are their favourite breeding places. Instead of using the traditional method of protection—mosquito nets, people use synthetic pesticides like DDT, Methane and BHC. The mosquitoes have developed resistance to them and hence these chemicals are ineffective. They, however, cause allergies and asthma. Household insecticides sprays like Flit and Baygons are quite popular. People use electrically operated mats, coils, aerosoles, etc to combat the mosquitoes. The best method to save ourselves from mosquito menace is precaution. Cleanliness of surroundings, doomets and proper ventilation can keep the mosquitoes away. The civic authorities provide ‘fogging’ the lanes and streets to drive away : mosquitoes. Non-toxic drugs and kerosene oil should be used around the pools of stagnant water to kill mosquito larvae. Prevention is better than cure.
Question 12:
Recently you were deputed by your school along with a few other students of class XII for participation in the national exhibition on ‘Environmental Protection’ held at IIT, Powai, Mumbai. Write an article on the exhibition and highlight the need for preserving our environment. The article is for your school magazine. (Word limit: 200 words)
Answer:
Environmental Protection
(by ABC)
Recently the National exhibition on Environmental Protection held at HT, Powai, Mumbai provided a rare occasion to us to leam about the need of environmental protection. The exhibition displayed posters, charts, models and scientific instruments that highlighted how our environment is under constant threat of pollution from different sources. The leading themes of the exhibition were the protection of our forest wealth; keeping our rivers and lakes clean; degradation of mountains and hills and the hazards of air and noise pollution. The exhibition was an eye opener and highlighted the urgent need to protect environment at all costs. Students can play a leading and effective role in creating awareness regarding environmental concerns. The masses must be educated to keep their surroundings neat and clean. General public can be associated in all the activities of controlling pollution, greening, conservation of natural resources like air, water etc., taking care of deforestation, planning urbanisation and industrialisation. Students can educate the slum-dwellers about personal hygiene, cleanliness and the need of taking fresh food and drinking boiled water to ward off diseases. Thus, the cooperation of all sections of society is needed to preserve environment.
Question 13:
You have been awarded a prize for doing the best social service under ‘Each one, teach one’ project. Write an article for a monthly magazine in not more than 200 words on ‘The Role of Students in Removing Illiteracy’.
Answer:
The Role of Students in Removing Illiteracy
Illiteracy is a blot on the fair name of democracy in India. Although we have been celebrating golden jubilee of Independence, most of the people living in the villages and slums are unable to decipher what the leaders are talking about. The reason is obvious—they are illiterate. They can’t read or write. Poverty, ignorance, and lack of opportunities have deprived them of the fruits of literacy and knowledge. All know that education makes a man enlightened and perfect and helps him to prosper physically, economically and spiritually. It broadens our outlook by interaction with the masterminds and the geniuses of the age. Illiteracy is a real handicap in the progress of a democratic society. Politicians and middlemen take advantage of these simple people by misguiding them with false promises and rosy pictures. Illiteracy is the main cause of their exploitation at the hands of those who are better off.
Students can play an effective role in removing the curse of illiteracy. They can organise classes in groups by following the motto: ‘Each one, Teach one’. By sparing an hour a day, they can take the lamp of knowledge and literacy to the darkest nook and comer of the country. Their efforts must be supported by the government and non¬government agencies. Follow-up programmes are essential. We must initiate a continuous campaign against illiteracy.
Question 14:
You have organised a ‘Drug Abuse Redly’ in your school in collaboration with Rotaract Club. Write an article, not exceeding 200 words, about Drug Abuse for a popular magazine.
Answer:
Drug Abuse
Drugs have been used by mankind for medical purposes since ages, but never before has the abuse of drugs caused such a worldwide concern and posed an alarming menace. The abuse of drugs is now an international problem. Recent studies in India show that 88% of the heroin addicts in India are in the age group of 14-25 years. In fact, drug abuse has become a craze among school and college students.
Taking drugs starts as a ‘fun’ or a way to become ‘modem’. For some it is a ‘fashion’, for others a remedy of tension, frustration and mental agony. Children whose parents have strained relations become easy prey to drugs. Initially these drugs give a thrill but soon the user becomes an addict and these sedatives or narcotic drugs affect his health, head and morals adversely. He becomes a cripple physically, mentally and spiritually. Drug addicts indulge in anti-social activities and commit crimes sometimes leading to violence and death. Many habitual drug addicts become lethargic and parasites worse than beggars. These drug-addicts indulge in anti-social activities and commit crimes sometimes leading to violence and death. These drug-addicts deserve sympathy, kindness and love. Proper treatment can help them to give up drugs. We should enlighten the students about the devastating effects of drugs.
Question 15:
Write an article to be published in your school bulletin on how the cable T.V. is both a boon and a bane. Your article should not exceed 200 words.
Answer:
Cable TV — a Boon or a Bane
Television is a wonderful gift of science which combines the advantages of radio and cinema. One can visualise a variety of programmes round the clock. Cable TV has made it possible to visualise the remote and present diversity of channels to ward off boredom. Undoubtedly cable television has become the fastest growing medium of mass communication. It caters to the taste of everyone. We can watch films, serials, matches, soap operas, functions, speeches, discussions etc. It provides us instant news from the farthest nook and comer of the earth. Television can be used effectively for educational and literary campaigns and promotion of health and hygiene. It acquaints the viewers with the latest information and trends in fashion and society. TV is a powerful medium of propaganda for forming public opinion. At the same time it is not free from evil effects. It has vitiated our lives by making us addicts to the ‘idiot box’. Late night films keep people awake disturbing the peaceful rhythm of life. Students ignore studies whereas housewives postpone their domestic duties. Commercial advertisements develop the habit of superfluous consumption. In short, cable television is a boon but its injudicious or excessive use can also make it a bane for mankind.
Question 16:
Write an article in 200 words for your school inter-house competition on the following : Vocational Training—as a Part of the School Curriculum.
Answer:
Vocational Training—as a Part of the School Curriculum
Modern education is bookish, theoretical and divorced from the harsh realities of life. The so-called liberal education gives the students a broad outlook but does not enable a young man to earn his living. Our boards and universities produce lakhs of students every year who are willing to take up white collar jobs, but they hesitate to do any manual work. No government can afford to provide white collar jobs to every educated person. Thus, every year the number of educated unemployed is rising. The only solution to this problem is vocational training. In fact, vocational training should be made a part of the curriculum. It will create an awareness amongst us that no work is , inferior or bad. We should teach the students the dignity of labour and let them learn and earn.
Literary pursuits and manual activities should go side by side. Thus, vocational training can stand a student in good stead and he cam take up a job if the need arises. In short, vocationalisation of education is essential to remove many ills prevalent in modern set up.
Question 17:
Write an article in not more than 200 words on the topic given below:
‘Possible steps to deal with the problems of slums in our cities’.
Answer:
Problems of Slums in our Cities
Slums are courts, alleys or streets of dirty, crowded houses. The courts are small, alleys are blind and streets are narrow. There are heaps of rubbish and filth lying in the open. The narrow streets are unpaved and usually there is no sewerage. The poor dwellers of slums live like animals and are unaware of personal cleanliness. They eat dirt, drink dirt and breathe dirt. They stink in stench and rot in rubbish like beasts or worms who eat filth and loll in filth. It should be realised by the society and the government that these slum dwellers are also human beings like us. The affluent section of the society must try to alleviate their sufferings. Health, education, proper housing, electricity, water, sanitation and jobs are some of the problems of the slum dwellers. Poverty is their enemy number one. Poverty leads them to indulge in many crimes. They should be provided basic amenities. Free accommodation, subsidised rations, health care and education are a must to bring them back to social folds. Some persons do not like to leave slums. They dispose of the free laiid allotted to them by the state and prefer to move to other shanties. This tendency is to be checked. Persuasion can help them change their attitude.
Question 18:Write an article for your school magazine in not more than 200 words on the following: Value Education – a Remedy for Social Evils.
Answer:
Value Education — a Remedy for Social Evils
Modem education is merely academic and prepares students to acquire degrees or diplomas in general or specialised fields. There is no stress in the educational institutions to uplift the students morally, spiritually and physically. Morals, ethical values, performance of duty, regard and consideration for fellow human beings, sympathy and compassion seem to have gone with the wind in this modem, complex and fast competitive era. We should realise the real aim of education, which is not confined to mere cramming,, of literary pieces or facts of science.
Education means the all round development of man. It makes an individual responsible, sensitive and a decent human being. A really educated person has the capacity of self sacrifice. A dedicated individual is a boon to the society and the nation. Our education should lay stress on cultivating human values. In fact, value education can help in removing all social and cultural evils. We need vigilant and emancipated men and women to help India march forward. Thus, value education is the need of the hour.
Question 19:
Write an article in not more than 200 words on the following:
Poverty is the Cause of all Social Evils.
Answer:
Poverty is the Cause of all Social Evils
Poverty is the state of being poor. We find around us hordes of people who are unable to afford the minimum necessities of life. They face the problem of getting a square meal for one time. Clad in rags they can be seen engaged in petty jobs to earn their food. They lead a miserable life which is worse than that of brutes.
Hunger and poverty force them to become shameless and they adopt evil practices to combat with their circumstances. It is poverty that leads to criminal activities like robbery, thefts, murder, kidnapping and arson. The young street urchins teasing the vendors or the young boys selling tickets in black market are the products of poverty.
Deprived of proper amenities such as food, clothes and education, these children grow into rowdy youngmen. Since they fail to get good jobs, they are forced to adopt dishonest means to earn their livelihood. Most of them turn criminals not because of I love of adventure but because of hunger and poverty. Most of the criminals are found living in slums and poor colonies. In fact, poverty compels them to indulge in social evils and nefarious practices. If we want to eradicate social evils, we must alleviate
their sufferings and poverty.
Question 20:
Write an article in not more than 200 words on the following:
‘East or West, Home is the Best’.
Answer:
East or West, Home is the Best
The saying has a great truth behind it. In his quest for adventure, exploration or lure for name and fame man moves away from his home to far off places. Some of them may be more gorgeous, splendid and attractive for a while but they fail to hold the sojourner as soon as their lure is over. It is then that he yearns for home. Remember that a home doesn’t mean a mere structure of bricks and stpne. It is a place where he gets love, rest and repose. This place of shelter is both a haven and heaven with all its bliss. Man, being a social animal, enjoys the company of his near and dear ones most and feels relaxed in the familiar surroundings. A home provides all comforts, ecstasy and bliss which money fails to supply. It provides us a sense of identity, a sense of belonging and oneness with the family and society at large. By inculcating the healthy values of mutual trust, faith, love, cooperation, sympathy and self-sacrifice, it inculcates in us love for fellow citizens as well as motherland. In fact home is the nursery of good manners, conduct and character. The peace and comfort of a home beckon the tired traveller to reach home at the earliest. Whenever we are away, we yearn to go home and feel home sick. Such are the charms of sweet home.
Question 21:
Write a composition in not more than 200 words on the following:
Books are Our Best Companions.
Answer:
Books are Our Best Companions
Books enlighten us, cheer us and encourage us. They make us healthy, wealthy and wise. Books are our best companions as they never desert us in our hour of need. Friends may give us a cold shoulder in our adversity, but not so the books. They amuse, entertain and inspire us even in our darkest hour. They provide a welcome escape from the dullness and drudgery of life.
Books contain best thoughts and experiences of the noblest mind that ever lived on the earth. They are repositories of knowledge and give us a glimpse of the divergent cultures, traditions, creeds and customs. Books are a source of pleasure and healthy diversion. When we are sad or alone, books provide a cheerful company. Loneliness is no trouble for a reader. The modem world is changing fast and one who wants to keep himself abreast of times must keep oneself well informed. Now we can have books on the computer as well. Reading makes a full man. Indeed books are the treasured wealth of the world, the fit inheritance of generations and nations.
Question 22:
Write a composition in not more than 200 words on the following:
A Scene at a Railway Station.
Answer:
A Scene at a Railway Station
Last Sunday I had to go to the station to see off one of my friends. There were long queues before the booking windows. Coolies were busy in transporting luggage and escorting the passengers to the requisite platforms. After buying a ticket for my friend and a platform ticket for myself, I, too, took the help of a coolie who took us to platform no. 9 where a train bound for Mumbai was ready to depart. A large number of passengers were moving to and fro to board the train. Some were looking at the reservation charts while others were busy chatting with friends and relatives who had come to see them off. The railway platform presented an interesting, amusing and absorbing scene. The hawkers were having a very good time. The book stalls also attracted customers. A wide spectrum of society could be seen among the passengers. There were men, women and children of all classes and shades. The passengers, who had to go for mourning, could be seen mourning. Young brides and bridegrooms, groups of athletes or school children could be seen smiling and laughing. Thus, scenes of joy and sorrow could be viewed in juxtaposition. As the train whistled to depart, people shared some parting exhortations and waved good bye. The hectic scene soon changed to one of stillness as the platform presented a deserted look within a couple of minutes.
Question 23:
Gayatri Model Sr. Secondary School, Ganga Nagar, celebrated its Annual Day on 14th March. The school magazine incharge, Mrs. Katyal asks Jyoti, a student of Class XII to write a detailed description of the event for the school magazine. Write the same in not more than 200 words.
Answer:
Annual Day Celebrations
(By Jyoti, XII C)
Our school, Gayatri Model Sr. Secondary School, Ganga Nagar, celebrated its Annual Day on 14th March. The State Education Minister, Miss Girija Vyas was the Chief Guest. She was welcomed by the Principal and the Head Girl at the school gate and then led to the science block to witness the art and painting exhibitions and Science and environment workshops. The Chief Guest planted a sapling in the campus. The guests were then led to the horticulture section comprising lawns full of beautiful flowers and fruit bearing shady trees.
After ‘Saraswati Vandana’ the Principal read out the annual report highlighting the achievements of the school in all spheres – academic, sports, cultural activities. The Chief Guest gave away prizes to prize winners in different fields and then made an impressive speech. She praised the efforts of our school management, Principal and teachers for popularising women education. She laid emphasis on overall development of personality. She noted with pleasure the contribution of our school students to social causes such as eradication of illiteracy, untouchability and campaigns against use of drugs or child-labour.
Her illuminating and inspiring speech was followed by a brief cultural programme. The various items dwelt on burning social issues such as national unity, prohibition, pollution and drugaddiction.
The function came to an end with the vote of thanks by the Vice-Principal and the Head Girl. All the guests and the students joined in singing the national anthem. Thus ended the most important day in our current school year.
ARTICLES FOR NEWSPAPERS
Question 24:
You are Rani/Raghav. You are very much concerned about the changing attitude of politicians who are using religion for political gains. Write an article in about 200 words for publication in a local daily suggesting these people to separate religion from politics and work for the betterment of the society.
Answer:
Separate Religion from Politics
(by Rani)
It is distressing to observe the changing attitude of politicians who are using religion for political gains. Dining the election period the politicians go to different areas and praise the religion that is being followed in that particular region so as to have political gains. Thus creating religious differences among the people which later result in communal riots.
People should not believe whatever the politicians say on the eve of elections. They should themselves think what is right and what is wrong. Mixing politics with religion should be discouraged. Those politicians who use religion for only political gains and selfish ends and not for the betterment of the society should be discarded and voted out. People must seize the initiative to separate religion from politics. Communal harmony is essential for peaceful co-existence in a society composed of diverse religions. Hence, people should separate religion from politics and work for the betterment of the society so as to live in peace and harmony as one nation.
Question 25:
You are Rani/Raghav. Many organisations have come forward with the idea of ‘Education for All’. In spite of their best efforts it is still a dream. Write an article in about 200 words for publication in a local daily giving suggestions to make it a reality as education is the only way to progress.
Answer:
Education for All
(by Raghav)
A few years ago the Delhi Government directed the Education Department to implement the new scheme EFA—“Education for All”, in order to educate all the people of Delhi. Teachers of many schools participated in the workshops headed by Education Officers to carry out the scheme with the help of non-government organisations and students. However, it met with partial success. Despite their best efforts, this is still a dream. I think it would have been better if the government had employed fresh and young unemployed dedicated teachers to teach the uneducated people, particularly in the villages and the slums of Delhi. Another positive step is to open a few temporary schools in the slums with the facility of mid-day meals. This would look after the physical, social and educational needs of the illiterate slum dwellers. The parents would feel encouraged and inspired to send them to such schools instead of engaging them in menial jobs to earn their bread. It is a well known fact that the poor can hardly make both ends meet.
The experience of running Adult Education Centres is of no help in the ‘Education for AH’ programme. Teaching unwilling, young, hungry and unfed children is far more difficult than teaching illiterate adults. Besides patience on the part of the teachers, some physical facilities and audio-visual aids are essential to eradicate illiteracy.
Question 26:
As a newspaper reporter, write a report of a train accident, the site which you visited. :Your report should not exceed 200 words.
Answer:
Train Accident: 100 Killed, 400 Injured
Jammu: 26 Feb., 20XX
Raman: TOI Correspondent
Yesterday I happened to visit a site near Jammu where a ghastly train accident had occurred. On enquiry from the eye-witnesses it was learnt that the accident occurred in the early hours of the morning, 2.50 a.m. to be precise, when a sudden explosion sent shock waves in the nearby villages. The scene of accident was a gory one. Many passengers lay stranded in the coaches which had been damaged, derailed and sandwitched by the onslaught of the Jammu Tavi Express running into a standing goods train. The impact of the accident was so severe that five coaches were derailed, two of them turned turtle and crushed badly. The bodies of ill-fated passengers were mauled and mangled, distorted and disfigured by the sudden impact. The railway protection force, civil police and many volunteers were engaged in extricating the wounded passengers from these bogies. More than one hundred persons had died on the spot. About 500 passengers were sent to Jammu hospitals. Others who had received minor injuries were given medical assistance on the spot. There was an atmosphere of bewailing and heart rending cries. A team of high ranking railway officials arrived at the site. Though the cause of accident was not clearly ascertained, human error is not ruled out. The Railway Minister expressed shock and sympathy with the unfortunate victims and announced grant of immediate relief.
Question 27:
Krishna along with his friends visited the city of Agra, a place of great historical importance. After returning from the trip, he decided to write an article on Agra for a weekly youth magazine ‘Medha’. Write his article in about 200 words.
Answer:
Agra — The City of The Taj
Agra has achieved world fame for its historic monument the Taj Mahal. It is not a mere marble monument constructed in the memory of Mumtaz Mahal, it is a saga of love. Situated on the banks of the Yamuna river, the Taj appears to be a dream in marble on moonlit nights. Though it dates from a by-gone era—the golden period of Agra when it had the unique distinction of being the capital of India under the Mughals it is still one of the architectural wonders. Standing in the gateway leading to the Taj one has a panoramic view of the majestic complex. The Taj stands on a reused platform with tall white minarets at each comer of the platform. The central structure has four small ,(domes surrounding the huge central dome. The tombs of Mumtaz Mahal and Shah Jahan lie in the basement. However, in the main chamber above, we find replica of tombs. The whole building is decorated with intricate carvings of floral designs. The workmanship of precious stones inlaid in the marble is amazingly beautiful.
The Agra Fort is an impressive structure which includes Moti Masjid, Diwan-e-Aam, Diwan-e-Khas, Octagonal Tower and Jehangir’s Palace. It reminds us of the famous Red Fort at Delhi, as both of them have many similarities of architecture. The other places worth visiting are Jama Masjid, Dayal Bagh Temple and Akbar’s Mausoleum at Sikandra.
Of late these heritages are suffering from the ill-effects of environmental pollution. It is essential to preserve their pristine beauty and glory from the fumes of toxic gases and harmful smoke.
Question 28:
You are Mohan Bhatia, a Press Correspondent of P.T.I. at Mumbai. You got the information about a building collapse. After visiting the place you made the following notes:
‘150 feared dead — six storey building collapsed — Fire brigade on duty — 30 admitted to hospital — assistance sought in rescue operations — a number of people trapped inside the debris.’ Your report should not exceed 200 words.
Answer:
150 Feared Dead in Building Collapse
Mumbai: 23 July, 20XX
Mohan Bhatia, P.T.I. Correspondent
One hundred and fifty persons were feared dead when a six storey building in Andheri North collapsed due to sudden jerks of an earthquake that rocked the city yesterday. Heavy downpour during the previous week had inundated the whole area and made the soil damp and loose. This building houses two major offices of leading industrial concerns such as Godrej and Ranbaxy besides providing shelter to 120 families. On the night of the earthquake at least 800 persons were sleeping inside the building. The first tremors were felt at about 2.20 a.m. and some of the old and sick residents raised a hue and cry and rushed out in the open. Hardly had their shouting subsided, when came the major tremor which lasted for about 50 seconds. The western part of the building was severely damaged. The fifth and the sixth storeys collapsed, crushing the inmates under their debris.
Immediately after the earthquake, the civic administration sprung into action. Rescue operations were started in right earnest to provide timely help to the victims. The officers and men of the fire brigade were assisted by young’ volunteers from various non-government organisations. Thirty injured persons were rushed to hospital.
Assistance of army was sought in rescue operations as considerable number of people were feared to be trapped inside the debris. The state Chief Minister visited the site and assured full cooperation.
Question 29:
Seema Pant had a discussion with her friend on co-education. After hearing the negative views towards the subject from her friend, Seema decides to write an article on the advantages of co-education for a famous monthly magazine ‘Kanya’. Write her article in not more than 200 words.
Answer:
Advantages of Co-education
Kanya: March 20XX
Seema Pant
Coexisting happily and in a healthy atmosphere is a hallmark of the civilised society.
Co-education provides aq opportunity to the boys and girls to grow and study together in harmony. Thus, the necessary fear, craze and mysteiy about the opposite sex is ” removed from the mind. In the modem society women are constantly striving to be equal to men in all spheres. Hence it is imperative to groom girls from an early age to equip themselves with the psychological and intellectual level essential to deal effectively with the members of the opposite sex. Similarly, men have to work with women colleagues and in order to feel comfortable in a healthy work relationship, they need to shed their awkwardness, excessive male chauvinism, and sense of superiority , or domination. It is essential that boys and girls grow with a respect for each other’s individuality. They should develop normal modes of behaviour and progressive ways of thinking. Co-education helps in building the all round personality by removing many complexes and making the person’s approach wholesome and sound.
It is often noticed that an adult person’s behaviour in society is dependent on the environment he grows in. Hence, the influence of early childhood and adolescence leaves a marked impression on him. Co-education prepares the adolescents to learn the value of adjustment by understanding the viewpoint of the other party. Confidence, tolerance, maturity, communicative competence, expressive ability and feeling of healthy competition are some of the virtues fostered in adolescents through co-education at school stage.
Question 30:
Bala Vaidyanathan of Hyderabad feels highly disturbed to see that in spite of government legislation against the dowry, cases of bride burning are on the increase as per the newspaper reporting. She being extremely sensitive decides to write an article on the immediate need for eradicating this social stigma for publication in The Times of India. Write the article in not more than 200 words.
Answer:
Evils of Dowry System
Bala Vaidyanathan: The Hindu
Dowry system has been prevalent in India since time immemorial. However, what was once a ritual offering as a token of love has now degenerated into a menace that has spread like a contagious disease and spoiled the lives of thousands of young brides and ruined so many families. In this male dominated society, the position of women has always been denigrated. The provisions of the Constitution to safeguard the honour and equality of women are easily ignored. The Anti-Dowry Act, 1971 is broken with impunity. Newspaper columns are replete with details of bride burning and dowry deaths.
We are entering a new millennium but the exploitation of women goes on unabated. Women do not lag behind men in any sphere, yet the cruel and inhuman system of dowry forces women to bear the brunt of torture at the hands of menfolk. The demands of dowry hungry persons go on mounting. There is an upward swing in the divorce cases all over the country. A social awareness, in fact a second reawakening, is essential to put an end to this social stigma on women. Young men and women should come forward to uproot this evil. Mere pledges to eradicate dowry are not sufficient. Let words be translated into action. Women organisations should play a constructive role by educating women not to fall victims to callous and greedy dowry seekers who perpetrate this evil practice which ends in bride burning, divorces or break up of families.
Question 31:
You are Vinod/Vimla. You are worried about the hikes in the prices of essential commodities like gas, pulses, vegetables, etc. Write an article on this in about 200 words for publication in a local daily, suggesting certain steps to curb price hikes.
Answer:
Rising Prices Create Crisis
Vinod, HT, 5th March, 20XX
The present world has become a difficult world for the common person who finds it increasingly impossible to make both ends meet. The primary cause is the rising prices of essential commodities. The prices of domestic gas, pulses, vegetables, fruits, etc. are sky-rocketing and three square meals a day has become a distant dream.
The drastic changes in economy invariably lead to hike in prices of commodities. The increase in the prices of petrol or diesel tends to affect the entire economic structure of, the nation.
The trade, industry and agricultural sectors are put at stake because the prices of petrol govern the life of the common consumers. The spiralling prices do not have any impact on the elite sections of society. It is the middle class and the people living below the poverty line who are hardest hit.
With liberalisation and globalisation, there has been an increased entry of multinational and other corporate giants into our country. The government should ensure that the rich do not enjoy these services at the cost of the poor. To ensure equity, higher taxes should be levied on these companies and indigenously produced options encouraged. This will ensure a minimum level of quality of life for the lower socio-economic groups. The government should also seriously boost the marketing and sales of its own agricultural produce. This will ensure a favourable environment for domestic agricultural growth. Policy decision makers should keep the poor person in mind at all times.
Question 32:
You are the member of the Environment Club of your school. After visiting many places you have realised that it is the need of the hour to protect our environment. Write an article on this topic to create awareness among the people. (Word limit: 200 words)
Answer:
Need for Protecting Environment
(by Ayushi)
There is an all round degradation in human environment. People complain of scorching heat, respiratory problems and ill health. It is time to pause and consider the cause behind all this. Global warming is increasing due to greenhouse gases.
There is an urgent need to bring about awareness regarding environmental concerns. The impending doom can be foretold quite easily if no timely steps are taken for protecting environment.
Environmental pollution is the gift of galloping population, unplanned industrialisation, mining and haphazard and faulty town planning. Indiscriminate felling of trees and deforestation to utilise more land for agricultural purposes have added to the problem. Emission of poisonous smoke and poisonous gases, the effluents and the industrial waste have destroyed the purity of air. Minute particles of poisonous matter are suspended in the air and lead to respiratory problems like asthma, bronchitis, irritation, skin diseases and eye problems. The noise of loudspeakers, honking of horns of vehicles and music parlours impair our ears and create a deafening sensation. Both eyes and ears are affected if you are stranded in a traffic jam in a metropolitan city like the highly populated national capital.
Under these circumstances it is essential to create awareness among all the people to keep the environment clean and pure. Vacant spaces may be turned into green pastures with saplings and trees all around them. Efforts should be made to maintain the ecological balance. We can arrange mass rallies or walks to create public awareness and force the concerned authorities to take preventive action.
Question 33:
You are very much concerned about the wastage of money and manpower due to the frequent elections in your country. Write an article on the urgent need to have a stable government. (Word limit: 200 words)
Answer:
Need for a Stable Government
(by Rohit)
The frequent elections in our country are a burden on our economy. Crores of rupees are unnecessarily wasted in an election for a single constituency. If the whole amount spent by the government, political parties, candidates and their well wishers is computed, it comes to billions of rupees in a single election. During the last 5 years, our Parliament have been very short-lived. Three general elections in four years four governments collapsed, the longevity ranging from 13 days to 13 months. Besides a burden on the state exchequer, these elections utilise the energies of men and consume materials which could be gainfully employed for the development of the nation.
The fractured verdict in every election should be an eye-opener to our esteemed members of the Parliament as well. The people, it seems, repose no faith in single political party. It is not a time to squabble and pull each other’s leg but to provide peace, progress and prosperity to the poor nation. People want good governance which is possible only by stable governments. The heterogeneous combination of motley groups seems to be more worried about their own coordination and survival than about the fate of the nation. If the present system has failed, some other viable alternative within democratic framework should be explored. The supreme consideration is man. Alexander Pope’s lines are quite relevant to the present scenario :
“For forms of government let the fools contest, what’ver is best administer’d is best.”
Question 34:
In the recently held elections to the Lok Sabha only a small number of women could get elected as members of Parliament. In view of this situation write an article in about 200 words on the reservation of seats for women in the Parliament.
Answer:
Reservation of Seats for Women in the Parliament
(by Vatika)
Our Constitution grants equal opportunities to men and women. The women have the right to franchise and contest elections. Speeches are made and slogans raised in favour of women empowerment and high place accorded to women in India. The reality is just the reverse. The recent elections to the Lok Sabha can serve as an eye opener in this respect. Only a small number of women could get elected as members of Parliament. In fact, the number of women parliamentarians is decreasing every time. The male-dominated society only pays lip service to womenpower. Actually, the males still want to dominate and do not allow women to be superiors or bosses. If the situation is analysed dispassionately, we find much to say in favour of women. They constitute fifty per cent of electorate, but their representation in Parliament is not even five per cent. It is an anomaly. Our traditional customs, values and ethos of society do not encourage women to contest against men and come out victorious. The only option left in the present situation is the reservation of seats for women in Parliament on the lines of reservation in local bodies. It is hoped that this will rectify the imbalance and pave way for greater representation of women in politics and Parliament.
Question 35:
While going to your school in the morning you noticed hundreds of men and women queuing up before the vegetable booth of your locality. On inquiring you were told that they were waiting to buy 2 kgs. of onion on their ration cards, as they were selling at a very high price in open market. In anguish you decide to write an article for publication in the paper, suggesting ways and means to overcome this problem and avert its recurrence in future. (Word limit: 200 words)
Answer:
Rising Prices
Kavita TOI, 15 May, 20XX
It is an everyday occurrence now to see hundreds of men and women queuing up outside government outlets and fair price shops for taking a rationed 2 kgs of onion.
It is learnt that there is a scarcity of onions in the market. Bad crops, untimely rains and the greed of the unscrupulous stockists and hoarders have resulted in a crisis for the common man. The government has to respond to the situation to save the consumers from the avaricious dealers. While adopting stringent measures against the offenders, supplies of essential goods have to be maintained to restore public confidence. Those guilty of creating an artificial scarcity must be brought to book. The devious acts of the miscreants should not go unpunished.
The ‘onion shortage’ may serve as an eye opener for those responsible for managing production and distribution networks. At present it is in the hands of private firms. The government departments should enter the market as a healthy competitor. This needs rooting out corruption from government departments and a sense of dedication to serve the people. An enlightened consumer movement is essential to keep healthy check on dishonest and fraudulent middlemen, dealers and stockists who resort to nefarious practices to feather their own nests.
Question 36:
You saw a stray dog beaten to death by a group of boys. Their act infuriated you and you scolded them for their cruel act. You decided to write an article on cruelty to animals. Write the article in 125-150 words. You are Nikhil /Naina.
Answer:
Cruelty to Animals
—Nikhil
It is our moral duty to treat animals with love and compassion. But we can’t fulfil our duty properly. There are a lot of cases of animal cruelty in our society. Recently a stray dog was beaten to death by a group of boys. Animals are killed by poachers for their skins and teeth ar| used for the medicines and ornaments. Even in circus, they play to the tune of their ring masters. The circus owners make a lot of money showing their play and tricks to the people.
We must adopt positive and protective approach towards animals. Their survival is must. Cruelty to animals must be stopped at any cost. Then only this environment can survive and balance can be maintained. Cruelty of man towards animals should stop. There is the need of social awakening. Mass involvement and commitment is required to bring about a change in attitude.
Question 37:
To enforce strict discipline in schools and colleges is a great problem now-a-days. As Mohan /Mohini, write an article in 200 words for The Hindustan Times, Delhi about the problems and your views on punishment as a corrective measure. (Word limit: 200 words)
Answer:
Discipline
The Hindustan Times, 25 July, 20XX
Mohan
Discipline is a means of keeping the things in order. It inculcates in us a sense of duty and obedience. Discipline is the bedrock of any institution. It is essential in all walks of life. Absence of discipline will lead to chaos and confusion. Discipline is a training of the mind and character and implies submission to rules. Discipline must be inculcated early in life. However, a glimpse of the existing scenario reveals that
discipline is sadly lacking in all spheres of life. Our students look upon national leaders as their role models. Every other day we hear of strikes and demonstrations in schools, colleges and universities. Gandhiji advocated satyagraha and boycott of classes for a specific purpose, but now students take recourse to mindless strikes at trivial issues. Elections to students’ bodies have also ruined the healthy academic environment. Now students who enjoy political patronage care a fig for the school/college authorities. Earlier corporal punishment was awarded at school to bring an erring scholar to the right track. ‘Spare the rod and spoil the child’ is the most hated maxim now. Proper counselling and guidance by parents and teachers can help the students to maintain discipline. Punishment — physical or financial — has failed to be a corrective measure. We must check good students from falling in the clutches of rowdies who vitiate the academic environment and pollute the atmosphere.
Question 38:
Recently you read in the newspaper an incident in which the children tried to imitate the stunts shown on television and embraced death. You have decided to write an article on the hazards of television watching for kids. Write an article for The Hindu, the daily newspaper, in not more than 200 words.
Answer:
Hazards of Television Watching
The Hindu, 7 March 20XX
Shruti Natarajan
Television has become the most popular and the cheapest source of entertainment these days. Children have in fact become TV addicts. No doubt children are curious and fearless by nature. Of late a disturbing trend has been noticed. Children have become more aggressive and love to watch action films, stunts and movies full of violence and horrors. Such programmes enkindle in them the desire to be supermen by undertaking misadventures. Some programmes exhibit formulae to disappear and wrapping others with a magic wand. The jumps from five storey buildings into ocean or from the roof of one moving train to another are fairly common. Last month a few school children died while imitating these stunts, shown on television. The gory result was predictable. It is true that there is a warning at the beginning of such programmes. The only remedy lies in complete ban on such hazardous programmes as they fan and fire flames of violence in young minds. During the impressionable age the innocent children are moved by their inner urge to imitate their seniors and if possible, do better than them. Parents, society, film makers and exhibitors all must unite in order to save young children from violence and misadventures.
Question 39:
Mrs. Batool Naseem of Golconda, Hyderabad feels highly disturbed to see that in spite of all possible help from the government and voluntary organisations the cyclone affected people from coastal areas of Andhra are not getting sufficient food and medicines to keep themselves alive and free from epidemics as per the newspaper reporting. She being extremely sensitive decides to write an article on the immediate need for extending the desired help to these people for publication in The Hindustan Times. Write the article in not more than 200 words.
Answer:
Plight of Cyclone Victims
Golconda: 23 Oct. 20XX
Batool Naseem
The coastal areas of Andhra Pradesh were hit by a super cyclone this year. The sudden devastation took the toll of thousands of human lives besides rendering lakhs of them homeless. Animals and crops have been lost. Houses and belongings have been destroyed. These cyclone affected people have lost their means of livelihood. A visit to the shelters and camps of these unfortunate victims of nature’s fury fill our eyes with tears. Though the voluntary organisations and the government have taken all possible steps to help them, but the people are not getting sufficient food and medicines to keep them alive and free from epidemics. Many cases of deaths through anaemia and lack of proper nutrition have been reported in the newspapers. Our visit revealed the distressing state of affairs prevailing there. The number of cyclone affected persons was ever on the increase and thus all help and facilities ran short. Food and medicines were short in supply. Sanitation was not proper. There is urgent need of providing more relief to save these sufferers.
Question 40:
This year children of many schools in Delhi took a vow not to use crackers and other fireworks on the occasion of Deepawali to reduce air and noise pollution and also to register their protests against the child labour involved in this industry. The next day, almost all the important national dailies published this news with great appreciation for this unique gesture on the part of the children. Getting motivated by this news, write an article on ‘Role of Children in Curbing Blackmarketing and Criminalisation
in Politics’ for publication in The Educational Times. (Word limit : 200 words)
Answer:
Role of Children in Curbing Blackmarketing
and Criminalisation in Politics
The Educational Times, 15 Oct. 20XX
Piyush, Staff Reporter
This year the children of many schools in Delhi have left an indelible mark in this festive season by vowing not to use crackers and other fireworks on the occasion of Deepawali. It has indeed been an unprecedented gesture on their part. The students who are conscious of their responsibility enlightened the society towards the urgent need to reduce air and noise pollution besides registering their protest against child labour involved in this industry.
If the young students jpreate this awareness, the society must pay attention to the larger maladies that afflict the social fabric. Corruption, black marketing and criminalisation in politics are the rampant malaises. Essential commodities, specific
luxury items, reservation of rail/air tickets, issue of passports are some of the greener pastures for the selfish, corrupt and criminal manipulators to indulge in. Glaring examples of hoarding and black marketing include the sugar crisis, salt crisis, mustard oil crisis and the recent onion crisis. Politicians are hand in glove with criminals who break law with impunity. In some of the states criminals contest elections and get elected. Let no institution honour these criminal turned politicians.
The students can play an effective role in drawing attention to the various ills afflicting the society. It is now up to the grown ups to hold on to the baton and evolve effective steps to curb blackmarketing and criminalisation in politics.
Question 41:
The other day you went to a local Public School for admission of your nephew to their : K.G.Class. On contacting the Admission Incharge of the school you were shocked to learn that the admission test was merely a formality. The admission was to be granted not based on the merit of the child but on the parent’s capacity to pay a fat capitation ” fee to the school. You felt extremely upset over this educational evil. You decide to write an article on the exploitation of parents by some of the private schools to be published in The Times of India. Write the article in not more than 200 words.
Answer:
Exploitation of Parents
The Times of India, 10 March, 20XX
Vibhuti Mishra
Liberalisation of economy in India has generated more wealth and a never satiating consumerism. Unfortunately even education has fallen into the clutches of consumerism and the economics of demand and supply. Parents who are a bit well-off want to provide quality education to their children. English medium schools and so called public schools have mushroomed and are flourishing on the weaknesses of class conscious parents. Leaving aside a few reputed and established names, most of these newly sprung up schools are no better than teaching shops. They mint money at the cost of ignorant and credulous parents.
The modus operandi of these Public Schools is quite simple. They insert tempting advertisements in newspapers highlighting their academic achievements and the facilities provided by them. They give a foretaste of their prestigious state by issuing the prospectus and admission forms for ₹ 200 to 500. Every school holds an admission test for the kids and an interview for the parents.
The other day I had to visit the little Angels Public School for admission of my nephew to the KG class. I contacted the admission incharge of the school and I was shocked to learn that the admission test was merely a formality. The admission was to be granted not based on the merit of the child but on the parent’s capacity to pay a fat capitation fee of ₹ 50,000 to 1,00,000.
I think this system is a fraud which exploits the parents and is being carried on shamelessly with impunity. The government should not remain a mute spectator. Accepting donations or capitation fee in admission should be declared illegal and cognizable offence. Effective remedial measures should be adopted to curb this menace.
Question 42:
The other day the Value Education Club of your school organised a visit to the ‘Home for the Blind’ in your town. There you got the opportunity of knowing the feelings and problems of the blind from a close angle. On your return from the trip you decide to write an article for The Times of India on the problems of the blind and the government’s expected role in solving them. Write the article in not more than 200 words.
Answer:
The Problems of the Blind
Harsh TOI, 25 May 20XX
A visit to the ‘Home for the Blind’ provided us the opportunity of knowing the feelings and problems of the blind from a close angle. Most of them revealed the story of their blindness. Only a handful of them were born blind, the rest lost their eyesight due to a stroke of bad luck.
These blind persons were engaged in activities that required skilled hands. Thus, they can earn their living and Eire not a burden or parasites on the society. The work house seemed neat and clean, but the dwelling places lacked proper sanitation. Their clothes were dirty and unclean. This unhygienic environment causes infection and spreads diseases. It is the duty of the society as well as the government to provide them basic necessities of life such as food, clothing, shelter, medicines and means of entertainment. They can’t see but their hearing is not impaired. The sweet songs and bhajans some of them sang are still vivid in my memory. Their living conditions can be further improved by establishing more such homes for the blind and teaching them skills which can help them earn more. They deserve care and honour rather than pity which sounds degrading to their ears. Except eyesight they are compatible to do other activities. These self-reliant persons should be accorded proper respect by the society.
Question 43:
You forgot your purse at home, which you realised only when you were buying the ticket in the bus. The conductor came to your rescue and paid for you. However, you have returned the money to him. Nevertheless you have developed a great regard for the polite conductors who are humane and in appreciation of his polite manners, write an article for your local daily under ‘Madras Musings’. (Word limit: 200 words)
Answer:
Meeting a Polite Conductor
The Hindu ‘Madras Musings’ 21 March 20XX
K Ramaswamy
Conductors are generally regarded as uncouth, insensitive and savage. Most of them are rude and treat passengers as inanimate objects. The rough appearance of the bus crew matches their rough behaviour and manners. They eye the passengers harshly as if they were confirmed offenders who indulge in ticketless travelling. I too, shared this general opinion about the bus conductors before I came across a polite bus conductor who broke my preconceived notions and prejudices.
Last week I forgot my purse at home and boarded the bus to my office in haste. When I put my fingers in the coat pocket, I realised that I had no cash on me. Perhaps the conductor realised my dilemma and bailed me out from this delicate situation. He accosted me with a smile and wanted to know my destination. He flicked the bundle of tickets with such an air of generosity as if he would book me to the farthest comer of the earth. I found a hundred rupee note in the inner pocket and paid the conductor. But this did not diminish my joy or the respect I had developed for this gentle, kind, cooperative and considerate conductor. He was polite and suave, soft and quiet. I am sure that there are many other good conductors like him. I hope and pray that their tribe may increase.
Question 44:
Pravin Chopra, Secretary’ of Health Club of your school is very much pained to see a newspaper article of devastation of fish caused by pollution in the sea. In order to highlight the hazards of environmental pollution, he decides to write an article for a local daily. Write his article in about 200 words.
Answer:
Hazards of Environmental Pollution
The Bugle, 23 October, 20XX
Pravin Chopra
Environmental pollution is the most dangerous health hazard for the modern generation. Progress in science and technology has resulted in advancement in the fields of industry, transport, medicine and agriculture. Population explosion has increased the population of cities. Urbanisation, industrialisation and rapid transport have resulted in pollution. Our environment is being polluted by different means through air, water, noise and food. Certain species face extermination and humanity is under a great threat.
The tall chimneys of factories emit out smoke and pollute the air. The smoke spewed by trucks, buses and other vehicles spreads poisonous gases as well as suspended particulate matter. Consequently city dwellers have become victims of incurable chest related diseases. The noise of machines in factories, vehicles, loudspeakers, etc. has brought deafness to millions. Even the water has become so polluted that fish do not find their survival there. Inhaling fresh pure air has become a thing of the past. Our soil which produces grain, vegetables and fruits has also been polluted by the excessive use of pesticides and chemical fertilisers. The soil pollution is contaminating the rivers along with the rainfall.
Question 45:
Mohit Sen, the president of youth forum of his colony, attends a seminar on rampant corruption in social and political life in India. He decides to write an article on the ‘Role of Youth in Combatting Corruption’. Write his article in not more than 200 words.
Answer:
The Role of Youth in Combating Corruption
The Yugantar, 25 Nov. 20XX
Mohit Sen
Corruption is rampant in our social and political life. Like cancer, it is eating into the vitals of the society. Self-serving politicians and their agents and power brokers can stoop to any extent to feather their own nest. Nobody is free from the needle of suspicion. Corruption seems to rule the roost everywhere. In government offices, it percolates from the top to the bottom. You pay the piper and call the tune’ or ‘Money makes the mare go’ are the unwritten tenets of our administrative-cum-political setup.
It seems that the older generation has given the go by to all that was good in India. It is the youth and specially students who have to take cudgels against this demon of corruption and crush it altogether. beginning can be made in this direction by holding anti-corruption drives. The ill-effects of corruption in public life should be publicised through inter-school declamation and essay-writing contests. Students should take a pledge to resist the temptation of using unfair means in examination. They can also go a step further and persuade their friends, relatives and parents to curb this evil at all cost. The dedicated efforts of honest youth are bound to succeed in the long run in demolishing and vanquishing this social evil which has earned us a bad name.
Question 46:
One day the Value Education Club of your school organised a visit to the ‘Home for the Lepers’ in your town. There you got the opportunity of knowing the feelings and problems of the lepers from a close angle. Write an article for ‘The Herald’ on the problems of the lepers and the role of the society and the government in solving them.
Answer:
The Problems of the Lepers
The Herald, 10 Feb. 20XX
Vibhu
The Value Education Club of our school organised a visit to the ‘Home for the Lepers’ in our town. This home was situated far away from the town. We drove there with eatables, fruits and clothes. We got an opportunity to interact with the lepers who revealed their feelings and problems. We could learn to judge things from their perspective. Then we understood their agony. They are considered worse than untouchables or outcastes. That is why they are compelled to dwell far apart in a lonely nook. Being afflicted by a wasting disease, they lose their fingers. Festering wounds on their palms, fingers and toes make their appearance revolting and nauseating. They feel a neglected lot. Government and society should make suitable provisions for these unfortunate victims of leprosy. They deserve sympathy and not hatred. Proper treatment can cure them and make them respectable citizens.
Question 47:
Mrs. Gita Bhatt of Dungarpur, Rajasthan feels disturbed to see that in spite of all possible help from government and voluntary organisations, the victims of drought in Barmer and other drought affected areas are not getting sufficient food, water and medicines. She being extremely sensitive decides to write an article on the need of immediate help to these persons for publication in The Jaipur Times. Write the article in not more than 200 words.
Answer:
Plight of Drought Affected People
The Jaipur Times, 25 September 20XX
Gita Bhatt
The sandy areas of Rajasthan such as Barmer district and its surrounding areas are hit hard by drought this year. Hundreds of persons and thousands of cattle have lost their lives. People have started migrating to places which afford sustenance. The state government and voluntary organisations have come forward to render help to these victims of vagaries of nature. Relief camps have been opened and food for work programmes have been launched. On paper all this looks good and sounds pleasing to the ears.
A visit to the camps and work sites filled me with distress. The hapless victims of drought are not getting sufficient food, water and medicines. Those who are able bodied, get work and food, but the others who depend on charity are leading a miserable life. Their bodies and clothes stink. A nauseating smell prevails in the surrounding areas. The victims of malnutrition and starvation can be seen in large numbers with their gaunt and emaciated bodies. I think that these persons need immediate help from all agencies and that too in sufficient measure.
Question 48:
Bani Mehta is a social worker. She thinks that all progress and advancement of the nation is being neutralised by population explosion. She writes an article for the Indian Express, Ahmedabad, expressing her concern about the alarming growth of population and suggesting some concrete steps to check it. Write this article in about 200 words.
Answer:
Alarming Growth of Population
The Indian Express, Ahmedabad, 2 December 20XX
Bani Mehta
From a nation of 36 crore people in 1947, India has become a nation of more than 100 crore people. The growth in population is phenomenal. We are the second most populous country in the world. However, if the growth rate goes on unchecked, we shall overtake China in the next twenty years. This population explosion is a severe drain on our natural resources and hampers all development programmes. Unemployment has increased. Then there is the problem of feeding the teeming millions as we go on adding an Australia to our population every year. Housing, clothing, education and medical facilities are required in the same proportion. This makes our plans an object of mockery. They fail to revive the economy as the target required keeps on expanding. The only ray of hope lies in having a workable, foolproof and scientific campaign of family planning. Vigorous drives must be launched to educate the masses on the dangers of over-population. China, which has frozen its population growth by adopting one-family-one-child programme, can be our model example. Strict laws should be enacted and enforced to punish couples who produce more than two children. These measures include heavy taxes, fines and debarring them from social benefits, getting government jobs or contesting elections.